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Author Topic: Hillbilly Tech Tips by Mr. Hillbilly (a.k.a. Ralph Meyer)  (Read 200 times)
Mrs. Hillbilly Les
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« on: December 08, 2016, 06:19:52 AM »

Trouble Shooting Hard Start Ups:  Check for weak battery, excessive moisture on high tension wiring and spark plus, cracked distributor cap, defective coil or condenser, worn ignition breaker points, coil to distributor high tension, cable not in place, loose connections or broken wire in low tension circuit, incorrect point gap or bad spark plugs.  Check gap on spark plugs, check for loose connections, oil soaked wiring.  Also check for bad or cracked distributor cap and rotor misfires can happen if timing is off, bad spark plugs, cap rotor or wires.  And for popping or spitting, check timing or carb settings, weak fuel pumps, fuel pressure regulators and fuel filters.

Your tech tip,
From Mr. Hillbilly
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Mrs. Hillbilly Les
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2016, 02:03:51 PM »

The model 2280 two barrel carburetor is standard on many '78-'79 Chrysler 318 engines.  It's also a replacement for 1962 and later Chryslers with a 273 and 318 motor; it also replaces the Rochester 2GC cards on '64-'73 Chevy's with the 283, 307, and 327 motors and on the '68-'69 Buicks.  Air flow capacity is 255 CFM.  The 3-piece aluminum design has metric metering jets and a gradient power valve and has a SAE 1 1/4 throttle body flange. 

And that's your tech tip from Mr. Hillbilly (a.k.a. Ralph Meyer)
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Krandall
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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2016, 03:09:35 PM »

The model 2280 two barrel carburetor is standard on many '78-'79 Chrysler 318 engines.  It's also a replacement for 1962 and later Chryslers with a 273 and 318 motor; it also replaces the Rochester 2GC cards on '64-'73 Chevy's with the 283, 307, and 327 motors and on the '68-'69 Buicks.  Air flow capacity is 255 CFM.  The 3-piece aluminum design has metric metering jets and a gradient power valve and has a SAE 1 1/4 throttle body flange. 

And that's your tech tip from Mr. Hillbilly (a.k.a. Ralph Meyer)

and those carbs are EVERYWHERE
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Coroner
Mrs. Hillbilly Les
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2017, 05:24:09 AM »

Not so Funny Noises:
Noise from the engine:
Noise:  Squealing. Source - loose or worn drive belt.
Noise:  A hum or whine that gets louder at times. Source - Alternator or water pump or even power steering pump.  The noise gets louder as you turn the wheel.
Noise:  Deep rhythmical thumping or thudding. Source - this is bad news.  The engine's main or rod bearing is the likely source.
Noise:  Soft rhythmical slapping that may stop as engine warms up.  Source - This is called piston slap, it's okay as long as it goes away when the engine is warm.
Noise:  Snapping or clicking along with rough running or loss of power of engine.  Source - electrical arcing in the distributor cap or spark plugs and wires.

Noise from tranny or drive train:
Noise:  Whine or howl when in park or neutral.  Source - Damaged hydraulic pump in the tranny or torque convertor.
Noise:  Loud clicking as the steering wheel in front wheel drive is turned.  Source - Faulty constant velocity or in short terms, CV Joint.
Noise:  Howl or whine only when accelerating or decelerating.  Source - Dry or damaged differential gears and bearings.

Noise from brakes.
Noise:  Grinding.  Source - this could be brake dust trapped in pad or your brakes need to be replaced as they are metal to metal.
Noise:  Squeaking.  Source - this could be one of a few things.  The warning clip telling you your brakes need to be replaced or a loose brake pad or glazed packs.
Noise:  Chattering brakes when applied.  Source - Broken brake pads or rotors, or drums that are no longer round or have high spot.


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